David Nicholson 1843

86 Solid

A solid 100 proof wheated bourbon that, while not "cheap" per say, doesn't break the wallet. It serves as a good base line wheated bourbon.

    What it is

    David Nicholson was a St. Louis grocer who, in 1843, began distilling or rectifying whiskey in his grocery store for sale to his customers. By the turn of the century, the whiskey was owned and produced at the famed Stitzel-Weller distillery in Shively, KY, original home of Weller, Pappy Van Winkle, Old Fitzgerald, and others. Like those whiskeys, Nicholson 1843 is a wheated recipe bourbon. It is not age stated, and is bottled at 100 proof.

    I have particular interest in this whiskey because of a couple factors. If you’ve read our blog often, you know one of my daily go-to bourbons was Old Fitzgerald Bottled in Bond. In an effort to re-launch that brand, Heaven Hill eliminated the 4 year old 100 proof variant sold in and around Kentucky in favor of releasing an older version as a limited release product. So I’m in the market for a replacement go-to wheated bourbon. Second, if you’re a ModernThirst regular, you’ll have read that the bulk, if not all, of Luxco’s bourbons have been sourced to-date from Heaven Hill… distiller of Old Fitzgerald. So that means that if I’m looking for a 100 proof 4 year old wheated bourbon from Heaven Hill…this is probably the closest I’ll come. The down side if the flavor profiles are close? Unlike the $13 Old Fitz Bonded I was accustomed to buying, this one is $30.

    David Nicholson 1843 Stats
    • Producer: Luxco
    • Distiller: Not stated
    • Proof: 100 (50% ABV)
    • Age: Not Stated
    • Availability: Available
    • Price Paid: $30

    Appearance

    Medium Dark Brown

    Nose

    Oak and cinnamon are prevalent, with hints of fruit cake, vanilla, and chocolate brownies.

    Taste

    Viscous and mouth-coating, there is plenty of  oak, spice, and more chocolate cake along with gingerbread cookie on the rear palate.

    Finish

    Fairly long, with spicy oak that turns slightly tannic as it fades.

    Synopsis

    This is really similar to Old Fitz Bottled in Bond. There is a touch more chocolate, and the oak is slightly more bitter than in the Old Fitz but it’s a very similar flavor. It’s close enough that most wouldn’t even notice a significant difference… except in the wallet, as this is nearly 3 times the cost of OF100. I tried adding water, and that brought out a lot more cinnamon, but it also increased the tannic bitterness of the oak on the finish. So I recommend not adding ice or water.

    ModernThirst.com Score: 86 out of 100 points.

     

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    About Author

    Bill is the Co-Founder, Editor-in Chief, and official Bourbon-o-Phile for ModernThirst.com. He is a native of Louisville, KY in the heart of Bourbon Country. He attended the University of Kentucky in the mid to late 1990s. Since college, he has dabbled in beer, bourbon, wine tasting, beer making, and currently works in finance. He has also been published on Liquor.com. He has conducted various bourbon and whiskey tastings in cities across the country. He is married with two daughters, and lives in east Louisville. You can follow him on Facebook and Twitter @BillStraub and email him at Bill@ModernThirst.com.

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