Hello you wonderful ModernThirst readers you!  Today we’ll be taking a look at a bourbon that is blended here in my great state of Texas but sourced from two states!  This is Treaty Oak’s Red Handed bourbon whiskey.  Although Treaty Oak are relatively new to the scene (founded in 2006), they live by a noble motto of “drink like you give a damn.”  Their Waterloo gin has won them many awards and accolades to prove they stand by just that.  However, rather than take the time to go over their history, since they have done such an amazing job of it on their site themselves, I’ll link to that here.

This bourbon is composed of a Kentucky and Virginia bourbon blend that equals to 68% corn, 17.5% rye, and 14.5% barley grain bill and is aged no less than two years, bottled at 95 proof.  Now that we have established the whiskey, let’s get on to the review shall we?

Appearance

  • Medium brown

Nose

  • Smoky sweet barbeque, white pepper, black cherry, apples, and nutty carrot cake.

Taste

  • Brown sugar, maple, fresh grapes, hearty beef juice, smoky oak, and orange peel.

Finish

  • Starts very sweet but ends very dry, woody, and astringent.

Score

  • 85
Facebook Comments
85 Decent

Overall, Treaty Oak's bourbon is very solid. It is sourced from whiskies made in Kentucky and Virginia of course, but the blend makes it their own unique expression. Definitely not a bad one to put in your whiskey cabinet or collection.

About Author

Nick is a veteran writer about all things spirits, an avid brewer of craft brews, and self-proclaimed whiskey fanatic from Houston, TX. He had written for close to a decade about spirits for Examiner.com but is also a systems administrator by trade in the field of IT. He's been spotted at several high-profile tasting events all over Houston, and has made tons of friends in the beer, wine, and spirits world over the years. He is married with two sons, and currently resides in the Houston suburb of Tomball. You can follow him on Twitter @fykusfire.

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